University help.

I wrote a blog a little while ago about how stressful, and difficult I was finding the process of getting support for my autism, dyspraxia and dyslexia at university.  The process has actually become more difficult as it’s gone on. I mentioned that despite having official diagnoses of Autism, dyslexia, and dyspraxia I still had to go back and be re-tested because these were diagnosed before I was sixteen – despite being life-long conditions.  I went for this assessment recently.   It was supposed to be for approximately an hour and a half, but I ended up being there for nearly two and half hours.  I have to say the entire experience was unpleasant, and above all unnecessary. First of all I resented having to be tested at all, considering I had indisputable proof that I have these conditions.  But rather than sitting down and simply asking me what I needed help with, and then getting on and helping me, it was almost as if I had to go through the whole process of being diagnosed again, simply to get the support I am entitled to.  They said that the tests were to see if I still had dyslexia and dyspraxia, or if I had a specific learning disability. I have to say this confused me because I always thought dyslexia and dyspraxia were specific learning disabilities. But to tell the truth, it wasn’t even the pointlessness of the situation that annoyed me the most, it was two other things: the first one being the embarrassment factor – the fact is tests like this are designed so that you`ll fail them, and they keep going until you do fail. So this in itself, by its very nature, is embarrassing – a complete stranger testing you on stuff until you finally fail.   But for me, I simply felt that the entire thing made me look much less intelligent than I actually am.  I was first published when I was twelve, and currently write for three on-line newspapers as well as this blog. I know my handwriting and spelling are poor, and this is one of the first things I told them, but the results of the test seemed to imply that I couldn’t read out loud, have a poor grasp of language, and I was told I need to read a lot more – when in fact I have been reading fluently since I was three, and always have at least two or three books on the go. In fact I`ve read more than anyone I know of my age. I’ve also been writing in one form or another – even if it is simply dictating the words – virtually every day since the age of eleven. Which leads me on to my second point; this was a test for dyslexia and dyspraxia, but I don’t feel my autism was taken in to account in any way, shape or form.   I was somewhere I`d never been before, with somebody I`d never met.  I wasn’t told what order the tests would be taking place in, or even specifically which tests would be happening.  As I said the test took an hour longer than I was told it would take, so I was unprepared for this. By the time we started to get to the halfway point – due to my autism – I was finding it incredibly hard to concentrate on what was going on. Therefore, things that I would have ordinarily found simple, such as reading certain words, proved impossible, simply because I couldn’t focus on what I was supposed to be doing.  This got worse as the test went on, to the point where I could barely even attempt some of the tasks that were supposed to be measuring my dyslexia, because of how bad the symptoms of my autism had become.  I don’t know how these kind of tests are for other people, or what others might have gone through to get help at university, but overall I am disappointed with the process so far. It reminds me much more of school – where you have to fight for even the most basic assistance – than college, where help was given freely to me. Also, making somebody pay to be retested for something they`ve lived with their whole life is ridiculous; if I go up to somebody and say that I have dyslexia, and I have a certificate from the Dyslexia Association confirming this, and I’ve had help and support for it from professionals as recently as last year in college, why should I then have to pay, and go through the process of a stressful reassessment simply so that they are happy with what I am saying to them?   If I have proof of something, and they don’t believe it, surely it’s up to them to come to me, and prove that I am wrong rather than me having to prove that I’m right.  I fully understand the concept of having to check what somebody`s specific needs are to give them the correct help, but it is a pity that people who work at such a high level don’t seem to understand that the best way to find out what somebody with a disability needs is to go ahead and ask them, and then to provide it.  Accommodating my needs is their job. Why should I have to jump through hoops before they will start doing it? I`m sure a lot of other people with conditions such as autism would feel the same way if they were in the position I`m in.  And this is what irritates me the most,  the fact that it has taken such a ridiculously long time – we had appointments so that we could talk about a form that they would send to me to fill out, and send back to them so they could send it to somebody else, so that I could meet with them and do a test, the results of which would be sent to somebody else who I would then meet with, so that they could tell me who I could meet with to actually answer the questions I`d asked in my very first meeting – when really, in my view what should have happened is I should have gone along to one meeting with the evidence I already have of my conditions, they should have told me what support they could offer, and listened to what I was saying I needed. We would have decided on mutually agreeable terms, drawn up a small programme which they then would have put in to place, and that would have been the end of the matter.  As it is, I`m just under two months away from starting university, and am still no nearer knowing if they will accept my diagnoses of autism, dyslexia and dyspraxia, than I was when I began this process five months ago.   I am not singling out any particular individuals for criticism, it’s just the way the system is set up in general.  It`s as if somebody sat down and said ‘how can we make the process of somebody with a disability getting to university as long and time consuming as possible?`  Overall, it has all been a bit of a shambles.

My name is Paddy-Joe Moran. I am a 19 year old autistic author of two books, and co-founder of autism advice service ASK-PERGERS?If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s, or simply want to talk about it check out my free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS? On Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

Also to read more from me go to my blog https://askpergers.wordpress.com/

And have a look at my books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but I did co-write them trust me on that!)   http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/book/9781843106227

http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/book/9781849052757

 

 

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