Monthly Archives: January 2018

There`s no excuse for using bleach as a `cure` for autism.

Once again there are stories in the news about parents making their autistic children drink bleach in a vain attempt to “cure” them of their autism. I don’t think I really have to say why this is so bad, or the harm that it can do. We all know you can’t “cure” autism, and I would hope we all know how bad drinking bleach can be. The so-called cures at best burn your insides and cause immense pain, and at worst put people’s lives at risk. As I say I should not have, in 2018, to be writing up an argument for why giving bleach to children is not a good idea. But it seems to keep coming up. Every few months or weeks there will be a new story about it in the news, or online. Someone else in the UK or USA has worked out they can make some money out of selling a “cure” for autism. So they make up a mythology around it – namely that autism is caused by parasites of the gut, and that drinking the cure will kill the parasites, and therefore cure the autism. Of course there is no truth to any of that.

The people who try and sell this just see a way to make money, and don’t care who they hurt as long as they get paid. There have always been people like this, and there always will be, it’s just a sad fact of life. People who will pray on others fears and exploit them for money, no matter the cost. What worries me more is why the level of fear is so high in the first place?

This is not meant to in anyway excuse the people selling the bleach, but the truth is that people are willing to buy it off them, and feed it to their children. OK they might not know what is in it, but lets take this point by point.

  1. We should all know by now that there is no cure for autism. That is just a fact. We see so- called “cures” all the time, and they range from diet to bleach. But if you have an autistic child you owe it to them, and to yourself to make sure you fully understand what autism is. It is not something that can be cured – this is not a statement about alternative medicine vs real medicine, it’s just a statement that whatever the “cure” it’s a lie. I don’t think it’s too much to hope that parents should understand and grasp this most basic of facts if their child has been diagnosed.

  2. I have seen more than a few comments along the lines of “ This is shocking, you can understand why the parents got so desperate, but it’s still shocking.” My reaction upon seeing comments like that is always the same “No, I can’t understand why someone would want to poison their child.” I am not trying to make out like autism is always a good thing, or that it can’t be hard at times. I could not even begin to count the days of my life that have been ruined by meltdowns, overloads and other autism-related stresses. Autism is never wholly good, it always comes with some bad parts that make life harder, and yes can make the lives of the parents of the autistic child harder too. Add to that the worry a lot of parents have about how the world will treat their child after they are gone, the knowledge of how cruel the world can be to anyone who is different/vulnerable, and the wish to spare their children from that, and we can see why some parents might feel anxious about their child’s autism. But again I say, even knowing all of that, I can not for one second imagine why someone would feel that slowly poisoning their child would help make things any better. I think sometimes there is a desire not to attack parents, and to even sympathise with them to a point, but there has to be a limit to that. I have seen the same kind of comments on stories where parents have killed their autistic children in premeditated and brutal murders “ Well it’s sad, but you can understand what drove them to it”. This has to stop. I don’t care how hard you think your life is, I don’t care how stressed-out you are, killing or hurting your children is beyond the pale in the eyes of any decent society, and it’s about time we stopped using being stressed-out with the child’s autism as a way to bring sympathy back to the perpetrator.

  3. There is still a fear of autism, that much is clear. Despite all the good work autistic people have tried to do over the years to convince others that our lives are worth living, and that we are not something to be feared, it’s clear that old-fashioned attitudes are still worryingly prevalent. To see that fear in people who have never had any contact with autistic people is worrying enough, but to see it in people who’s own children are autistic is the real worry. Have these parents not taken the time to read the books, articles and blogs written by autistic people that debunk pseudoscience, and talk about how autism is not something to be scared of? They must know their children are autistic, but it feels like they would rather talk about made-up cures on secret Facebook groups than face up to facts, and educate themselves. Ignorance, as we know, is a great breeding-ground for fear. Far from being bliss ignorance is like a fog through which we can only glimpse the shape of something we are dimly aware is out there, and of course when half-glimpsed through fog anything will look scary. But wilful ignorance of the kind where you choose to ignore decades of research in to autism and pretty much everything ever written on the subject by autistic people, and believe that feeding your child bleach will make everything OK is like being given a torch to illuminate a path through the fog, and deciding instead to hurl it away from you at one of the shapes you can’t quite make out.

You would be forgiven for thinking that the deeper we go in to the 21st century the more we as a society would reject pseudoscience, and outright lies about health. But that’s not true. This can be seen in the resurgence of the anti-vaccine movement as well as in the desire for wilful ignorance in regards to the use of bleach on autistic children. We should be living in a time where autism and autistic people are accepted and understood, and it’s true that we are more than ever before. But it’s also clear that those levels of acceptance and understanding are nowhere near as high as they need to be. There is still far too much fear out there, and sadly, despite the best efforts of autistic people, it does not look like this is going away anytime soon. While there are still parents out there who choose to shout down the voices of autistic people who dare to suggest that autism might not be the worst thing under the sun, while at the same time choosing to buy in to a scheme that is only going to hurt, and potentially even kill their child out of fear of something they choose not to understand, then there is still work to be done. I would love to live in a world where a story of parents forcing their autistic children to drink bleach is shocking, and not just repetitive. Because that’s what makes it even more scary, the fact that we have all heard this story before, and I know for a fact we will hear it again, and more than once before 2018 is over.

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

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The sensory impact of a cold.

I have talked in the past about how in the days before coming down with some kind of illness I can be prone to meltdowns, almost as if I am reacting to the illness before I even know I am ill. When I say illness this can apply to anything, even a simple cold like the one I woke up with this morning. But I have not had any meltdowns for some time now, and I felt fine in the days leading up to this, but that’s not what I wanted to talk about in this blog. As I say I don’t always have a meltdown before I come down with something, but having a meltdown or being stressed-out/ grumpy with those around me can be a sign I am coming down with something. But what I noticed this time that I have not thought too much about in the past, is how much worse my sensory issues tend to get when I have a cold.

I find it so much harder to be around others (I have spent most of today in my room) and I think this has quite a bit to do with the sensory impact of a cold. Most colds don’t come with any pain (if you are unlucky you might get a headache) but they do hit your senses. Take the one I have today – no pain at all to speak of, but a blocked nose, a fuzzy feeling in my ears, and a constant strange taste in my mouth. At times I find myself getting hot and starting to sweat, and at other times my eyes start to water. I have noticed today more than ever before how stressful those things can be. It feels as if I can only spend a few minutes around other people before I have had enough, and I start to snap at them, or just have to go and be on my own again. That’s not because of how bad I feel, as I say it is only a cold, in fact if I were in pain I know that I would cope much better. I have a high pain threshold and can keep quite calm when in pain. But I think the key thing about a cold is how it hits all your senses.

It’s hard to explain, but it’s as if my body is having such a hard time processing all this extra sensory input that I hardly have any space left for any more sensory input, such as people talking to me.

I tend to find that pain is much more easy to deal with; it might be bad but it tends to stay in one place, and it’s easier to cut off from the rest of my body. Even when I have been in the worst pain of my life I have been much more able to sit and talk with people, and process what they have to say to me than I am when I have a pretty normal cold. So it’s not just a case of me feeling sorry for myself. But when all your senses are working overtime, thrown off balance and struggling to keep up with what is going on it’s hard to have any space/ability left to cope with other day to day sensory inputs. This is something I have never thought much about before, but when I talked to my Mum about it she said that she often feels the same thing. Because I am autistic I do not process sensory input in a passive way, and therefore the more inputs I have to deal with the harder my mind has to work to process them all. Processing what someone is saying to me takes a lot more active engagement for me than it would for someone who was not autistic, and when I am thrown off balance by strange sensory input (such as feeling suddenly very hot, or having a blocked nose and the strange feelings that come with that) it seems to have very little energy left to engage with, and process anything else.

You could make the argument that if you feel ill, even if it’s only with a cold, then you are going to be more irritable and less able to focus anyway, but as I say this is something I have noticed specifically in relation to colds.

As soon as my nose starts to clear, and my ears no longer feel as fuzzy I can get on with much more normal stuff again and spend time around people, but when I am fully in the grip of a cold I can barely even be around others for a few minutes before I am overloaded, and need to get away from them. I find myself much more able to keep working through pain than I am to work with a cold, and overall colds are much more disruptive to me than just about anything else. I do think there is a link between the sensory effect of a cold on the body, and my lack of ability to deal with day to day sensory issues such as people talking to me when I have one.

I wonder if any of you have noticed the same thing? Does a common cold have more of an impact on you than feeling real pain would? And if so do you think that impact is due to the sensory impact of a cold?

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Writing aims for 2018.

Last year was a bad year for me writing-wise. I put up at least two blogs where I talked about what a strange year it was, and how little I had got done so I wont go over that too much here. I just want to write a bit about what my aims for 2018 are, and why it matters for me to get back in to my writing.

First of all blog-wise I want to put out at least one blog per week. I am already on track with that with this blog, and the one I have already posted this year. Of course keeping that up for a full year is a bigger task, but that’s why I want to write blogs in advance, and plan out when I am going to be putting them up instead of just writing them when ideas come in to my mind. It’s also why I am open to ideas relating to what you might want to see me write about on here this year. If you have any ideas feel free to comment below, or get in touch via Facebook or Twitter. Last year I did write a bit on why blogging was important to me, how it helps me get my ideas out there without having to worry about them meeting somebody else’s standards. And I do feel that is one of the great things about blogs; autistic people can put our ideas and advice out there for each other (and non- autistic people wishing to learn more) to read and learn from. Sometimes if I am having a hard day just coming a across a blog that puts in to words something I have been dealing with can be a huge help, and I know from comments left on my blogs that my writing can also have that effect. I enjoy putting up blogs, and I also like the fact that at times what I write can help other people.

When it comes to books that’s a bit more open. I know I would like to write at least one book relating to autism in some way in 2018, but I am not quite sure what that will be. There is a lot around that subject that interests me so it’s a case of working out what I feel able to talk about and what I want to talk about first, and getting something together. That being said I would also like to do more work on my non-autism related books this year – as some of you know I do write horror/crime books, and I would like to make sure I put the time in to edit the draft of the work I have already done, and write the first draft for another book.

That’s really it when it comes to writing goals for the year, but the main point underlying it all is I want to get back to enjoying writing, and thinking of myself as a writer. Being a writer should be the easiest thing in the world – all you have to do after all is sit down and type. I am not talking about getting to the stage of being a published author or even being a good writer to the point where other would enjoy your work, I am just talking about being a writer. If you write regularly and finish your projects (it does not count if you leave everything half way through!) then you’re a writer. Odd then that there are such a lot of people out there saying they wish they could be writers. Perhaps what they mean is they wish they could be published because as I say to be a writer all you have to do is decide to write, and get on with it. Sometimes it is easy to lose sight of that though, easy to drift off and leave weeks between spells of writing, to fall in to that trap of waiting for the right moment to write, and that’s when you stop thinking of yourself as a writer and start thinking of yourself as someone who would love to be able to write. I feel like 2017 was like that for me; I did not write anywhere near enough to call myself a writer last year, and I want 2018 to be different.

I do not normally care much for New Year’s resolutions, but there is something to be said for looking back on the past year and seeing if it was well spent. If not then when you turn to look at the next twelve months stretching ahead you have to think to yourself “How can I make sure when I am looking back on 2018 I am going to feel it was worth while?”

For me a year full of writing would be a huge step in the right direction in terms of what I want to go on to achieve in my life, and as I say when you bring it down to its most simple form nothing should be more easy to stick to than doing more writing.

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

The transition in to January: Why it can be so hard and what can help with it.

I have written quite a bit about how hard Christmas and New Year can be for autistic people, but it’s also worth saying how hard January can be. December is full of change and we all know how hard that can be, but by the time you have started to get used to it, it all changes back again. What you eat, what time you go to bed, your routine, the decorations everything goes back to normal pretty quickly. Because it’s going back to normal it might not seem like as big a change, but it is, and it can in fact be even worse. At least with Christmas you get time off or nice food – the change might be hard, but for a lot of people it at least comes with positives. But January is an almost universally hated month to begin with; nothing much happens in it for most people, the fun of the holidays is over, and everything changes back to normal within a day or two.

For autistic people there is also the fact that January can be spent dealing with the build-up of sensory overload that can come with Christmas. It’s not uncommon for a meltdown to occur days, or even weeks after the event that trigged it. There have been times where I have become overloaded due to going out, but have seemed to be doing quite well for three or four days after only to have a meltdown the next week. In December you have a month full of change and things that can lead to a build-up of overload, and the knock-on effect of that can be felt well in to January.

So when you put those things together you have a month that can be pretty dull and grim anyway, starts with a big change all of its own, and is more than likely still being impacted by the events of December.

What can you do about this?

The first and most important thing is just to be aware of it. That might sound strange or not specific enough, but it is extremely easy to forget all about how hard January can be. December is over and that is the month that draws attention to itself; the changes are very clear, and it’s easy to see what impact they might have. But everything changes back so fast it’s easy to forget how long that impact can last, and also to forget that the change back to normal life is a huge change all on its own. Add that to the fact that the year is literally changing, and you can see why you should be aware of how hard January can be, but also why it often gets forgotten about. Just being aware of the issues that might arise will help. If you’re feeling overloaded or stressed-out remember why that might be, and perhaps be on the look-out for signs of a meltdown, or just keep in mind that just because the year changes the build-up of overload will not go away.

Another idea might be writing down how things will change, and if these changes will be good or bad. This is something worth doing at the start of December too, and it might be that you do it all in one go – talking about how things will change for Christmas and New Year, and how they will change back. Or you might do another chart for January talking about how things will change back, how this makes you feel and what the impact will be, for example less time around the house, different food, and the fact that that might make you feel more stressed or overloaded. (If you want to find out more about our strategies for dealing with transition check out our book on the topic https://www.jkp.com/uk/helping-children-with-autism-spectrum-conditions-through-everyday-transitions.html )

If you can you might also ease yourself back in to things slowly. So plan things out: What day are you taking your decorations down? When are you going to change your diet? Perhaps don’t plan one day to switch everything back, spread it out over the first week or so of the year so that it is not so overwhelming. If you have work or school then you will have a set day you need to be back at that, but perhaps don’t change everything on that date. So you could take you decorations down the day before or the day after so that the change does not happen all at once.

It might also be worth planning a few nice things to do in January. It’s a month most people dislike and it can be made better by having something positive in it. This will not work for everyone as making plans to do things outside the norm can sometimes just create more stress and change. For me a positive plan might be to try and get out for a few walks in the park. So nothing with any real social interaction or travelling, just something to help ease the tension in a house containing two overloaded, autistic people!

It might be that your plans are small and specific like mine, or it might be than having a few bigger plans works for you. Nothing will work for everyone, and everyone is different so just find what works for you and stick with it.

December and January can be hard months – fun at times, but also hard – and one key thing that you have to bear in mind is some, not all but some, of the change you can opt out of. You don’t have any control over school, college being closed, but perhaps if there are shifts on at work you could take them. You can’t stop everyone else putting up Christmas decorations, going out or having a party for New Years, but you don’t have to make a fuss about any of it. You don’t have to change what you eat, what time you go to bed, you don’t have to stay up till midnight, and if you work from home you don’t have to stop working or change your routine over the holidays. I am not suggesting that you don’t get in to the holiday spirit as lots of autistic people (like myself) love doing so even if it comes with some challenges. But what I am saying is that for some people not making those changes, and therefore having less to change back in January, might make this time of year a bit easier. And if that’s the case then my point is that you should do what works best for you regardless of any pressure from family, or society as a whole. That might be more of a tip for the coming December, but I just thought it was worth putting in.

With all that being said I don’t want to sound like I am being wholly negative about this time of year. It can be nice to start a new year and look forward to the year ahead. It’s just that I know from my own experience that it can also be a hard time of year. Hopefully you all had a good Christmas and New Year, and January is not proving to be too difficult for you.

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762