Tag Archives: awaerness

My Discovery of Autistic Pride Day

Apparently on Saturday it was Autistic Pride day.  I have to admit I had no idea about this, and only realised it existed due to the tweets I was reading on Saturday afternoon.  This is why I am only posting about it once, and late.

Of course never having heard of it, when I started seeing people tweet about it, I wanted to find out more.  What is the idea of the day?  Why is there such a thing as Autistic Pride?  And might it be something I am interested in the nest time it comes around?

From what I can understand the notion of Autistic Pride day, or at least the way people choose to use it, is almost to counteract the effect of Autism Awareness month.  Not to imply that in itself is a terrible thing, or that all of the content put out during that month is bad.  But what you do find is that there tends to be a lot of conflict; some people want to `Light it up Blue` for example, while others are opposed to this, and there are stunts such as people locking themselves in glass boxes that are supposed to help autistic people. Overall, despite the idea of raising awareness of autism, it can be a conflicting and difficult month for anyone in the autism community, especially autistic people.  A lot of the tweets that I saw hash tagged with Autistic Pride day stated very clearly that this was not a day to raise awareness for autism.  It was not a day to raise money, or to push some cause, and it was also not a day for charities or carers or family members.  It was a day for autistic people simply to acknowledge each other, and take some level of pride in being themselves.

A lot of the tweets I saw made this pretty clear.  And there did seem to be a sense, especially with some of the younger autistic people who were tweeting, that it was a relief just to have a day where autistic people could actually take centre stage in the autistic community.  Now as I say, I don`t know a huge amount about Autistic Pride day, and what I have written above is just what I understood from the tweets that I saw.  But for me I like the notion of having a day that isn’t about awareness, that isn’t about how autism can impact on other people, and that isn’t even about a singular aspect of being autistic.  But is rather just a chance for autistic people to feel in some way part of a community of people similar to themselves.

So why would there be Autistic Pride?  Well this is just my personal view, and it will be completely different for other people.  I am not proud of the fact that I am autistic, but I am not ashamed of it either.  It is not something I had any control over so it is not an achievement on my part.  But for me, I feel that there is certainly an idea among neuro-typical people that if you are autistic, and you achieve something you have done that despite your autism, or by overcoming your autism along the way; as if I can be proud of who I am, and what I have achieved, but not that particular aspect of myself.  But I don`t see my autism as separate from who I am.  If I achieve something, for example I publish a book, then I am proud of that.  I am not proud of myself for `over-coming my autism` and publishing a book.  For me, and again this is just a personal opinion, the  notion of autistic pride is about saying that I can be proud of myself for doing things, or be proud of who I am as a whole, without discounting a huge aspect of myself, and what makes Me, Me.  If I am proud of who I am, and autism is integral to who I am, then in a way then yes, I suppose I am proud to be autistic.  And I think the notion of Autistic Pride could go some way to dispelling the myth that autism is a negative, destructive force, or a shameful part of us.

So is this something that would interest me in the future?  I don`t know if Autistic Pride day is an official event, or if it was just a hashtag started on Twitter so I have no idea if there will be another or not.  But yes it is something that I would have an interest in.  It is important to make sure that something like this doesn’t become corrupted, and end up being used by the wrong people for the wrong means – in the vein of Autism Awareness month and campaigns such as `Light it up Blue`  https://askpergers.wordpress.com/2016/04/02/light-it-up-blue-but-for-who/  The idea should always mean being guided by what autistic people want, and not by what non- autistic people feel is best, or appropriate.

For me it was nice to be able to go on to Twitter, and see people just saying that they are proud of who they are, and including autism in that.  This of course is something that you can do all year round, and you should do, but it would be nice to continue to have at least one day that is just about autistic people, and not the wider autism community.

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

And here`s the link to our new E Book Autism & Animals – the benefits of animals for autistic people https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01GO1N1X6

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Autism & Animals Meltdowns, Dogs and Me!

Like a lot of autistic people I have always struggled with meltdowns.  Ever since I was a very young child if I grow overloaded, or become too stressed, I can have a meltdown and shout, lash out, or break things.  Even though some aspects of these are less severe now than when I was younger, meltdowns are something I have struggled with my entire life.  There is very little that can help me to calm down, or relax when I am in the middle of such an outburst.  Or even make me feel better immediately after having one.  Possibly the only thing that can is having contact with my dogs.  My oldest dog Fred is nearly sixteen, and I am twenty-one, so for the majority of the time I have been having outbursts Fred has been there.

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I can`t remember how I first found out that Fred helped to calm me down.  But I know that after a while I started going to him after I had a meltdown, just to lie down with him, or stroke him, and that this would bring me a sense of comfort.  Even though Fred doesn’t always like being picked up, or stroked he always seems happy to spend time with me after I have had a meltdown.  And when I was younger just being able to spend that time with him would help me to relax, and calm me down.  I would walk round holding him and gradually become less and less stressed as I did so.  Even now as an adult the same is true.  Nothing calms me down quicker than being able to spend some time with the dogs.  I know this is something that is true for a lot of other autistic people, and even some people without autism.  Animals can just be a calming influence overall.  And if you are somebody like me who feels stressed and anxious every single day, and always has done, then having such a calming influence, that is also part of the family, is a huge help.

My dogs Fred and Poppy are the inspiration behind ASK-PERGERS?  new book Autism & Animals – the benefits of animals for autistic people, available for pre-order now J

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01GO1N1X6

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Awareness versus Acceptance ( re-post)

As I have been too ill to prepare anything for World Autism Day I am reposting this.

Awareness versus Acceptance

Many people argue about whether awareness or acceptance are what people with autism want from society.  Lots of people will say that an awareness of autism is fine, but people can be aware and still not accepting.  Virtually everybody thinks they know what autism is, but that doesn’t stop people being offensive.  And some people argue that acceptance suggests that it is up to the neuro- typical people to say `Oh, we accept people with autism` as if NTs can decide what types of people are acceptable, as if autistic people have put forward a fairly good case and they`ve been accepted in to the day to day order of things.  My view is somewhere in between:

Awareness

  • Awareness means everybody being aware of what autism is, and having at least a basic knowledge of it.
  • Awareness is a positive thing because it will hopefully lead to greater understanding, easier access to services, and make life easier for autistic people.
  • The vast majority of people are already aware of the existence of autism, even if they don’t fully understand it.
  • Awareness can help improve the lives of people with autism.
  • Awareness can’t solve all of the problems.

Acceptance

  • Acceptance means people who aren’t autistic accepting autistic people and their ways.
  • Acceptance can be very positive as it might make things easier in the work-place or learning environment.
  • The word acceptance does have a tendency to give a lot of power to the people without autism, as it suggests that it is up to them to decide if they want to accept autistic people or not.
  • A lot of people don’t like the phrase `acceptance` for that very reason.
  • Does this mean that acceptance is a bad thing?  No, it doesn’t. But it does mean that it is something that you have to be careful about when approaching.

Taking the positives and negatives from the concepts of awareness and acceptance, I think that there is a good ground to be reached somewhere in the middle.  Most people are aware of autism to some degree – even if it is just through Rainman. Some people are accepting of it without really knowing what it is.  For me the real key is understanding; you can be aware of autism, but not really know what it is.  Often this will lead to pity, people being patronising, or a belief that people with autism are either dangerous, or completely pointless trying to communicate with.  A lot of negative stereo-types pervade the public’s perception of autism; they are accepting yes, but quite often they are not accepting of real autistic people.  They might be aware, but in reality they are not aware of real autism, they are aware of the Medias` portrayal of autism.  That is why understanding is so important: you are aware of autism – good.  You are accepting of autism – good.  But do you understand autism?

For more information and advice on Autism/Asperger`s see our free on-line service

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To read some of my autism articles check out my author page http://www.autismdailynewscast.com/author/paddy-joe/

I have co-authored two autism books. Check them out J

http://www.jkp.com/uk/helping-children-with-autism-spectrum-conditions-through-everyday-transitions.html

http://www.jkp.com/uk/create-a-reward-plan-for-your-child-with-asperger-syndrome.html

Paddy-Joe Moran

Autism and the Puzzle Piece ………..

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The puzzle piece has become synonymous with autism, and with autism awareness over the years.  A lot of people use it, but most likely many of them don’t think about what it means.  I have been thinking about what it means, and what it represents recently, and I have to say that after giving it a lot of thought and consideration, and weighing up many arguments for and against, I am not a fan.  I am not suggesting it is immediately deeply offensive in the way perhaps racist language would be, and I am certainly not saying that people who use it mean to be offensive, or even mean anything negative about autism.  There are many reasons why I dislike it as a symbol, and in this blog I will attempt to explain what they are. This isn’t meant to be calling anybody out, and people should not feel like it is criticising them if they have used the puzzle piece.  It is simply my view, as somebody with autism, which I am putting forward to make people think.

In 1963 the NAS needed a symbol to represent autism because it had only been officially recognised about twenty years earlier, and it wasn’t really known about at all.  They wanted to be certain their symbol wouldn’t be mistaken for anything else.  There are a lot of charities out there, and finding a symbol that catches the public’s imagination, but isn’t too similar to anything else is difficult.  In the end they settled on a puzzle piece, with the image of a crying child in the centre, created by a parent member Gerald Gasson, This has to be seen in the context of the times, when the majority of people with conditions such as autism may have been institutionalised, and there wasn’t a great deal of care, support or understanding for autistic people.  The charity Scope was still known as the Spastic Society, and terms such as Moron, Imbecile and Idiot were still recognised medical diagnoses.  Virtually all the coverage of disability, learning disability, or any difference would have been negative.  So as a collection of parents who had set up what was probably the first autism-specific organisation in the world, they weren’t exactly in the best position to make sure everything was politically correct, and anyway political correctness as we see it today didn’t exist in the sixties.  When talking about why they opted for the puzzle piece and crying child, in the late nineteen eighties, one of the founding members said:

“The puzzle piece is so effective because it tells us something about autism: our children are handicapped by a puzzling condition; this isolates them from normal human contact and therefore they do not ‘fit in’. The suggestion of a weeping child is a reminder that autistic people do indeed suffer from their handicap.”

This type of language may have been acceptable in those days, but nowadays the concept of somebody being `handicapped` or `suffering` from autism is outdated –  that part was symbolised by the crying child, so the concept of autistic people not quite fitting in to society was therefore represented by the puzzle piece.  But there are actually still a number of problems with this idea which I will highlight below. The first and most important thing to say is that as with any point I raise in my blogs, it is not just me saying it.  I did plenty of research in to what other autistic people and their families think of the puzzle piece, and these are some of the main concerns that were raised

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  • The first point that many autistic people raise is the way this symbol assumes that we are puzzles, to be decoded in some way, rather than just people.  It is impossible to ever truly understand another person, so in a way we are all puzzles.  It has been said many times that if people would just listen to what autistic people have to say, or read what they write, then understanding autism and the autistic brain would be much easier.  It seems as if you might as well use a puzzle piece to represent people from Japan because you don’t understand Japanese culture, whereas if you simply take some time to talk to, and listen to Japanese people, things will become clear.
  • Another point – this one actually raised by people who are neuro-typical – is that the concept of decoding the puzzle of autism really seems to be more representative of neuro-typical professionals than it is autistic people.  Autistic people simply live their lives – they are not trying to put a puzzle together.  It might seem like a strange distinction, but I actually think it is an important point.  It does feel more like a symbol that would be worn by people who do research in to autism rather than people who actually live with it.
  • Although the puzzle piece is often used either without thinking, or with good intentions, people often misunderstand it, and its meanings.  Part of this may be to do with not understanding its history, and part of it may be because they assume it represents one thing, without actually thinking about it any more deeply.  This may be why so many parents, and even autistic people use the symbol.  And really it does complicate the issue because although in its origins, and with what it represents today, it is a negative symbol, it is used in a positive way by so many people.

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This sometimes makes it difficult to keep in mind what is wrong about it.   The real issue is that it is not obvious at first glance what it`s supposed to represent; people who defend it say that the pieces represent the families and friends of people with autism, the colours can represent diversity, and overall it represents the mechanical and logical workings of an autistic persons mind.  Now personally – and I know I am not alone in this – I don’t think any of this is obvious at first glance.  In a way it kind of makes sense, but it doesn’t really because none of those things actually call for a puzzle piece.  But if you think about it for a while you can kind of make it make sense.  The problems with this is you shouldn’t have to think about it – it should be instantly understandable at first glance.  The fact that it leaves so much room for interpretation is no doubt part of the problem. *

  • The puzzle piece is a fairly child-like symbol, using primary colours and big jigsaw shapes   A lot of autistic people may like bright colours, and appreciate the symbol on this level, but in a way, because it is so simplistic it does give the impression of being aimed at children – which could be seen to be reinforcing the negative stereo-type that only children are affected by autism. And it was actually designed to represent children because at the time the National Autistic Society was called The Society for Autistic Children (until 1982)

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  • The concept that there is a piece missing from people with autism which separates them from the rest of society is incredibly problematic.  It could easily be seen to be implying that there is a template for how people should be – a template of normality that people should strive to reach – and that because autistic people don’t measure up to this template, they are not full, complete human beings.  The truth is that people are different in all kinds of ways.  Autistic people don’t have something missing from them; they might feel things differently or think differently, but this is just who they are, and is not because a piece of them is missing.  And in a way the symbol does give the impression that if this piece can be found, and slotted in to place, autistic people will finally be whole.

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It is also worth noting that although Autism Speaks didn’t create the original puzzle piece, they seem to be the organisation most associated with it nowadays.  The bulk of their time, money and resources are spent on puzzling out autism; trying to find cures, and researching the causes of autism.  I personally don’t support them, but if you do that`s your choice.  I think that for a while the puzzle piece might have changed to represent a more positive image of autism, but now I believe that because of how much this organisation have been using it, and how it has become synonymous with their campaign to cure autism, it has gone back to its original meaning – mainly that autistic people are somehow lacking.  The debate over Autism Speaks is something for another blog, and I know it seems unfair to let them have the monopoly on an image such as the puzzle piece. But I do find it strange when people I know who speak out against Autism Speaks are happy to use the symbol that this same organisation plasters all over everything it ever puts out.

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Now it would be easy to sit here and say stop using the puzzle piece – I don’t like it, and nor do many other autistic people – but that perhaps would be a little unrealistic.  It has become so ingrained within autism awareness, and campaigns for acceptance that it would be difficult for people to stop using it overnight.  In fact there is an entire industry that appears to have grown up around it: clothes, jewellery, tattoos, to name a few, all featuring the puzzle piece.  Yes, if most autistic people are opposed to the puzzle piece then it should be retired, but I wouldn’t expect this to happen overnight – it may ultimately take years. The National Autistic Society dropped the puzzle piece in 2002, probably because they realised people in the autistic community were not fans of it, for all the reasons stated above.  And maybe in time other organisations will drop it as well?  I suppose the question that I am asking is this – if the NAS created the puzzle piece and used it for so many years, but have now ultimately decided that it is not a symbol they want to continue with, why have other organisations picked it up and ran with it?  If they took the NAS lead in using the symbol in the first place perhaps they should also take their lead in moving forward, and finding a new, more positive symbol?

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But perhaps the most important thing you can do when reading this blog is just to think.  If you have not already been doing so then take a moment now to think about the puzzle piece.  How many times have you seen it in literature, on the internet, in videos, on TV and in books?  Think for a second about what it actually means to you.  Not definitions given to you by somebody else, but when you see this image, what do you think?  Some autistic people have said that they like to be described as a puzzle as they find it appropriate for them, but I was actually surprised by the amount of neuro-typical people who when they stopped for a second, and actually thought about how they would feel as grown men and women being described as a puzzle, an enigma, or something to actually be put back together, realised that they would hate it.

This blog isn’t intended to make anybody who has been using the puzzle piece image feel guilty by the way – it`s not a big deal – just have a think about whether you want to continue using it, or whether you want to use something different?  I read a comment on an old Facebook page a while ago that I think perhaps could be useful.  The person in question was saying that when they first saw the puzzle piece it made them think that autistic people were a piece of society that had been ignored for a long time, and that it was society that was incomplete because of its refusal to accept different groups of people, so that instead of being a puzzle themselves, autistic people were just parts of a larger puzzle – that being humanity in general.  If  the puzzle piece isn`t to be retired completely,  may be it is worth thinking about this, and deciding exactly what it is you are trying to say or represent when you do use  the puzzle piece as a symbol of autism – what is your message, and if that message were aimed at you, how would you feel?

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You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34253.html/ 

For more information and advice on Autism/Asperger`s see our free on-line service

ASK-PERGERS?

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

To read some of my autism articles check out my author page http://www.autismdailynewscast.com/author/paddy-joe/

I have co-authored two autism books. Check them out J

http://www.jkp.com/uk/helping-children-with-autism-spectrum-conditions-through-everyday-transitions.html

http://www.jkp.com/uk/create-a-reward-plan-for-your-child-with-asperger-syndrome.html

Paddy-Joe Moran J

The Long-Term Impact of Bullying

People often view bullying as an unavoidable part of school life, or of childhood in general.  They might think it is a pity that some children get bullied, but they also think it is just a reality – just a harmless bit of playground fun.  But in actuality bullying can invade every aspect of a person`s life.  Nowadays, with the on-set and increasing incidences of cyber bullying, people of all ages can be bullied by complete strangers in their own homes.  There is also bullying in the workplace; either by the manager, or a group of colleagues.  So somebody can potentially be a victim of bullying their entire life, unless something is done to help them.  When you actually step back and take a look, bullying is prevalent everywhere from primary school to retirement homes.  The concept that bullying is something that happens to someone when they are at school, and then it`s all over is simply not true.  But perhaps a more dangerous thought is that any form of bullying doesn’t have a long-term impact on the victim.

The idea of the playground bully has become so ingrained in our society that it is almost as if we just view them as a normal part of life; just somebody who is there and does a job in society like everybody else.  But the long-term damage they can cause is probably worse than the majority of people would ever give them credit for.  It would be silly to say that all bullies are evil, or are even bad people.  Of course their own circumstances could be contributing to them becoming bullies, but this is no excuse.  And it really depends on the severity of the bullying; lot of people have difficult home lives, but they don`t all chase people through lanes of traffic just to kick them in the head.  If you take adult bullying out of the equations and just look at a scenario of somebody who was bullied through primary and high school, it is not uncommon for those years of school to feel almost like a prison sentence for that individual.  It must be torture for someone who is being bullied every day to have to continue to go to school.  At every other point in our life our perception of time is that it goes incredibly fast, and yet in our childhood and early teens we perceive time as trickling by slowly, and so if somebody is being bullied the idea of school stretching on for several more years can feel so daunting that many children often contemplate suicide as a way out – the fact that otherwise healthy children can contemplate killing themselves should put in to some perspective just how psychologically damaging bullying can actually be.  Often the victim will begin to feel worthless, and almost as if they deserve to be bullied.  People can become physically ill and develop mental health issues such as panic attacks or depression, and of course there are often physical injuries as well.  Even when the child has left school those feelings of worthlessness and depression will often remain.

Being bullied is often extremely traumatic.  Because everybody knows somebody who has been bullied, to describe it as a trauma might be looked upon as being a little over the top – but if somebody is surrounded by a group of people who beat them up, and verbally abuse them over a period of years then what is this other than traumatic?   Another aspect of why the after effects of bullying in childhood can last so long is that there is hardly ever any real come-uppance for the bully themselves; most children who bully might get some kind of superficial punishment, but it is nothing at all in comparison to what they have done.  This may seem fair as a lot of people will later grow up to regret what they did in childhood, and even hate themselves for what they did to others.  But this is of no help to the people they have hurt.  It is hard to get over something when there is no closure; if a bully has made every day of an individual’s life hell for years, and then they simply walk a way to happily get on with their own life, then it is incredibly difficult for the target of that bully to feel like things are actually over.  And so there is often a long-term, emotional impact for people who have been bullied.

I am not offering advice on how to deal with the long-lasting effects of bullying for multiple reasons: the first being that I may well cover this in another blog later on in the week.  Another reason is that I suppose it would completely depend on the individual, and the type and severity of the bulling they have experienced – so there is no simple solution to this problem.  I am sure if you have experienced bullying yourself you don’t need me to tell you – or remind you – about the long-term effects, but hopefully this blog has been of use to some of you.  I should also point out that I am not writing specifically about people with autism here – bullying is an issue that can affect anybody in society, and its severity should never be underestimated.

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

 

University:

The last few months have been very difficult, but now everything is finally sorted out for university.  After months of phone calls, meetings, assessments and providing evidence I finally have a grant, along with all the support that I will need in my course.  Although I haven’t started the proper course yet, and have only been doing introductory parts of it, it is still evident that the things we fought for will come in very useful throughout the three years that I will be at the university.  I don’t have a huge amount to say in this blog, the main point that I wanted to make is that there is no real way to make this simple – it can be very difficult getting the help and support needed for university.  But I also firmly believe that it is well worth it.  Some universities are very good and services will go through without any hitches, so don’t automatically think that you will have a very hard time getting what you need before you can attend university.  I have already talked in my blogs about how difficult it has been, so there is no need to go in to too much detail here.  The main thing to remember though, if the process is difficult, is that it is worth sticking to it.  For us it seemed that at every turn something new was coming up, that threw-up a whole wave of other problems.  But at no point did I ever feel that I wouldn’t get to university, or that it would be worth quitting, and not going.  In fact I felt the opposite; that because it was so difficult to get there it would be worth perusing even more.  Nothing should be off limits to people who have disabilities, and unfortunately I do know of people who have quit half way through the process, and dropped out of university because of how difficult it was to obtain the support they needed.  I would never have a go at them, or say they had done the wrong thing because everybody obviously have the right to choose what they do in their own life. But it is a pity that they felt they were denied the opportunity to a further education because their disabilities were not catered for.

Obviously I have no idea how I will find the next three years at university – it might be good or it might be bad, to put it simply. But the simple fact that I was able to go, and to get all the help and support that I need, which for a long time it looked as if I would not, feels like an achievement in itself.  I know this blog is very short, but now I am adjusting to university I hope to get back in to the routine of putting one up every week or two.  If there are any particular issue you would like me to talk about please let me know below in the comments or on Twitter or Facebook.

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS? On Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Awareness versus Acceptance

 

Many people argue about whether awareness or acceptance are what people with autism want from society.  Lots of people will say that an awareness of autism is fine, but people can be aware and still not accepting.  Virtually everybody thinks they know what autism is, but that doesn’t stop people being offensive.  And some people argue that acceptance suggests that it is up to the neuro- typical people to say `Oh, we accept people with autism` as if NTs can decide what types of people are acceptable, as if autistic people have put forward a fairly good case and they`ve been accepted in to the day to day order of things.  My view is somewhere in between:

Awareness

  • Awareness means everybody being aware of what autism is, and having at least a basic knowledge of it.
  • Awareness is a positive thing because it will hopefully lead to greater understanding, easier access to services, and make life easier for autistic people.
  • The vast majority of people are already aware of the existence of autism, even if they don’t fully understand it.
  • Awareness can help improve the lives of people with autism.
  • Awareness can’t solve all of the problems.

 

Acceptance

  • Acceptance means people who aren’t autistic accepting autistic people and their ways.
  • Acceptance can be very positive as it might make things easier in the work-place or learning environment.
  • The word acceptance does have a tendency to give a lot of power to the people without autism, as it suggests that it is up to them to decide if they want to accept autistic people or not.
  • A lot of people don’t like the phrase `acceptance` for that very reason.
  • Does this mean that acceptance is a bad thing?  No, it doesn’t. But it doesn’t mean that it is something that you have to be careful about when approaching.

 

Taking the positives and negatives from the concepts of awareness and acceptance, I think that there is a good ground to be reached somewhere in the middle.  Most people are awareof autism to some degree – even if it is just through Rainman. Some people are acceptingof it without really knowing what it is.  For me the real key is understanding; you can be aware of autism, but not really know what it is.  Often this will lead to pity, people being patronising, or a belief that people with autism are either dangerous, or completely pointless trying to communicate with.  A lot of negative stereo-types pervade the public’s perception of autism; they are accepting yes, but quite often they are not accepting of real autistic people.  They might be aware, but in reality they are not aware of real autism, they are aware of the Medias` portrayal of autism.  That is why understanding is so important: you are aware of autism – good.  You are accepting of autism – good.  But do you understand autism?

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