Tag Archives: stress

Autism and the stress of a simple walk

I have written a lot about sensory overload, and the impact this has on me and other autistic people, but there might be an idea that to get this overload I have to go somewhere busy, or noisy. This is not the case. In fact just the act of walking my dogs in the streets for fifteen minutes can be full of so much sensory and social stress that I become overloaded by the time I get back home. I would like to use this blog to explain how even something that sounds so small can be so full of stress. So let’s use the idea of walking the dogs as an example for now – the point being that I don’t have to go anywhere; I am not going shopping or to a meeting at the end of the walk, in fact I am just walking around and and then going home. So why is that stressful?

  1. Build up: There is still the build-up to going out even if I am only going on a small walk. I have to decide when to go, plan for it, get myself ready, and know that I will have to deal with all the stress that I encounter when I am out there. For some things you might be able to go out early in the morning, and get them over with, but other times you might have to wait and the longer you wait the more the anxiety about having to go at all builds up. It can get to a point, for me at least, where if I am not able to go out until the early evening – even if it’s for something I want to do and something I know will hardly take any time at all – I have had so long for the anxiety to build up that I would do almost anything not to have to go.
  2. Noise: The outside world is noisy: be it birds, cars, planes or people, almost anywhere you live someone or something is making noise. These are just the background noises of life, but sometimes, depending on how I feel, even they can be too much. In the course of walking down one road with my dogs I might have to contend with the sound of drilling, of a plane going over head, of people walking by talking, of music coming from cars and the sound of the cars themselves passing by. Because for non-autistic people these sounds just fade in to the background I think it’s easy for them to forget just how much noise there is outside on a normal day, and how quickly that can build up in terms of sensory input. It’s worth pointing out here that a lot of autistic people deal with this by using headphones, with or with out music playing.
  3. Crossing the roads: I have not had the chance to talk to a lot of other autistic people about this one, but I know that it is a real issue for me. Over the years I have known some autistic people who did not feel a sense of danger, and would just run out in to the road (some of whom have even been hit by cars/buses) but that is not what I want to talk about here. I want to talk about the awkwardness of crossing a road. When I get to a road no longer can I walk with my head down, not looking at anyone. I can’t stay lost in my own thoughts, blocking out the world around me. No, I have to come fully back in to reality. I have to look up and be aware, stop blocking things out, look around me and try and pick out the sounds of cars approaching from the noise all around me. I have to think and make decisions on the spot; do I cross now or do I wait? But it’s not just making that call, it’s all the things going on around me as I make it. There might be other people waiting alongside me; are they crossing? No? Why not? Is it wrong of me to try and cross now? Yes, they are crossing? Should I go too, or wait here? Should I have gone then? If the road is busy do I just stand here and wait, or keep walking and cross later? What should I be doing now? Am I doing the right thing or not? OK, you might say that is being silly, that none of it matters, and that if you’re unsure what to do just wait till there are no cars and cross – staying safe is all that matters. Fine, but that’s not so easy when you have a brain that will overthink everything without giving you much say in the matter. Then when you do get to the point of crossing the road there is the interaction with the drivers. Cars come to a stop and you have to look at the driver and work out what they are trying to communicate to you. It’s hard enough to read what someone is saying via non-verbal communication when your face to face and have the time to think about it, but trying to do it from a few feet away through a pain of glass when you`re in a situation where you are expected to move quickly (at least by the waiting driver!) it becomes even harder. You have to work out if they are slowing down to let you go or not. Are you waiting too long when they are letting you go? Are you misreading what they mean and stepping out when you should not be? Again the main question for me is am I doing something wrong here? And again the answer comes back, who cares? It’s not like the interaction with the driver means anything; it comes and goes and everyone moves on with their lives. I don’t care in the long run what the people in the cars think of me, and I know that even if they did think anything it would be forgotten in the space of seconds. But that’s the point, it’s not what I know to be true in my head that has the impact, it’s the way my brain over thinks that brings on stress from even these seemingly meaningless interactions. Overthinking brings on more stress and anxiety, so much so that it can get to the point where the worry about crossing the road sets in before I even get to them, no matter how much I know on logical level that it is a silly thing to worry about.
  4. Walking past people: Another point that relates to overthinking is when you pass someone in the street. There is little to no interaction with them; perhaps they might smile or say hello as they pass, but that’s about it. But if like me your anxiety makes you over-think things you will find that as soon as you see someone walking down the road in your direction you will start to worry about what to do. Should you look at them? Will that seem as if you are staring at them? If you look away will it look as if you are avoiding looking at them? As if you think there is something wrong with them, or are passing some kind of judgement? If you look away then look back up will it look strange? At what point do you step aside to let them pass if need be? Does any of this matter? The answer to that last question at least is a simple one. No. The chances are if someone walking down the street notices you at all they think nothing of you, and if they do it’s not like you would ever know or be able to guess. But again I must go back to the fact that just understanding this on a logical level does not do anything to lessen the impact that it has. It’s all about what’s in your head, and the fact is that unlike noise from the outside world, you can’t do anything to shut it off.

I hope that the points listed above give you some insight in to why even a short work with no big social interactions such as going to the shops, or going to work can be a stressful and anxiety provoking experience for autistic people. It’s not to say every walk will be like that, or that every autistic person feels the same things I do, but it might be that some of you out there understand how I feel. For me what can be so hard about the whole thing is knowing that apart from the noise, the rest of it is in my head. People are not judging me as I walk down the street or try to cross a road, and even if they were I would never know. But when your brain is pushing you in to thinking certain things and feeling anxiety and stress it can feel like there is not much you can do about it. When you add that to the noise that surrounds you as you walk down the street, and the stress and anxiety that is a part of the build-up to going out you can see how even a small walk can lead to a sensory and emotional overload.

It’s worth keeping in mind that an autistic person does not have to be in a room packed with people talking at the top of their voices to become overloaded. Something as small as walking the dog can be so full of anxiety and stress, and lead to so much overthinking that it can bring about an overload that might come as a surprise to the autistic person, and those around them. And yet when you break down what goes in to even a small trip outside you start to see that for a lot of autistic people it is not so small after all.

Let me know what you think in the comments, as how ever much I try, I can only really speak for myself.

You can find my book here  : http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum.html/ 

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Sensory Overload – what triggers it and how it feels for me.

I am writing this at half seven in the evening of what has been a fairly productive Monday. I was unsure when I woke up just how productive I would be able to be today because once again I am coming down from an overload. This particular overload lasted two full days; two days where I was unable to do anything, hardly even watch TV. I want to use this blog to talk a bit about why I was overloaded, and how getting this overload each time I go out to try and do something outside of my routine makes me feel.

So what brought on this two day overload? As you may or may not know – depending on when this blog goes up, and how closely you follow my blog – I went to an autism-friendly Mayoral Hustings on Thursday of last week organised by the Greater Manchester Autism Consortium and the N.A.S , and that is what brought on my overload on Friday and Saturday. This blog will not go in to any of the politics of the event, nor is it in anyway trying to criticize the event itself. It was a well run event that I enjoyed, and was glad to have had an invite to. But the fact that it was an autism-friendly event and therefore much better for me than a normal hustings would have been, and yet it still left me feeling so overloaded, should serve to drive home the point of the blog.

What does an overload feel like?

If we are talking about the lasting feeling of being overloaded, not the short-term feelings I get right before a meltdown – and for the point of this blog we are – then I would say an overload feels somewhat like I imagine a frozen computer might feel like. I can`t do anything. This might sound over the top, but I can assure you it is not; I can’t think clearly, I can’t make up my mind about anything, I can’t focus on anything, I can’t enjoy anything, and I can’t even do mindless things such as watch TV to relax. I am stuck; frozen for a day or two just wishing the time away till my overload clears and I can go back to my life. In fact sometimes this frozen feeling can last for a week or more. Sometimes there will be physical pain too; my ears and head will hurt to the point where the smallest of noises can induce pain, and my body will ache and feel tired in the same way it might after a heavy work-out. I find myself stuck in a state of feeling the time pass; knowing the day is going to waste, with me doing nothing more than looking at the wall and wishing the time away, and yet being unable to bring myself to do anything. And this in turn leads only to more stress, more frustration and often to meltdowns.

What brings on an overload?

For me, and lots of other autistic people, an overload can be brought on by doing things outside of our routines, and an increase of sensory input, for example noises, sights or smells and social interaction. All these things are hard for us, and I know that for myself it only takes a small amount of one, or all of them to push me to the point of overload. If we take the autism-friendly Mayoral Hustings, and break-down what I did that day you can see how it led to an overload.

First of all I had to go in to town which is not something I would normally do, so even the idea of the event itself started off the path to overload. There is also the fact that I don’t often go out on my own, and have hardly ever been to any kind of event with out my Mum or Dad with me. That in itself is a big change, and even though it was good to be able to go out by myself I am sure doing so for the first time still added to the stress. That day my morning routine had to change as I had to get myself ready to go out, meaning that even though I was used to the idea I had to put that idea in to practise – which, as I am sure you all know, is a whole different thing. In order to get to town I had to take a tram. Some days the trams are quiet, and some days they are noisy. The tram there was not too bad for most of the journey, but a few noisy football fans did get on around half way. This meant that before I had even got off the tram I had a lot of noise to contend with. I was early to the event as I try to be to most things, so I did not have to walk in to a busy room which was a plus. But as the room filled up it did become noisier, and it’s the build-up of noise that brings on an overload for me. A loud noise on its own might be unpleasant, but it won’t push me to be overloaded, but as the noises build-up: the talking, the moving of chairs, the scraping of shoes, coughing and such then it pushes me deeper and deeper in to an overloaded state. I was there for around two hours and there was something like seventy people in the room, so you can guess how much sensory input that was. There was also the matter of making small-talk with the people around my table. Now I did not have to do this; two of them knew me and would have been fine if I had not talked, but I wanted to. Talking and chatting might be hard for me, but I do enjoy it. I don’t want to go to events, and not have the chance to talk to people. But I am aware of the impact it has on me – as I said above social interactions play a large part in overload.

You can add to this the fact that I was meeting with and talking to political figures, and while I don’t feel intimidated by meeting people like that there was still the awareness that I was going to be on the spot talking to them, and asking them questions. It’s not a small event for anyone, but for someone with autism you can see how the day was full of things that can lead to overload, and there was no real way I was going to be able to do it without ending up with an overload.

Isn`t losing two days for one event too much of a price to pay?

This is what I found myself thinking on the Saturday. I enjoyed the event very much and loved having the chance to ask my questions, but after forty-eight hours of overload where I was unable to do anything I did begin to question if it was worth it. For one good event like that I will have two or three days where I have to do nothing, not even relax, just do nothing; drift around my house and wait for the hours to pass until I can get back to normal. It’s easy to ask myself should I go along to events like this? Should I give talks on autism as I sometimes do?, What’s the point of it all? But the question I always ask myself when I start to think like this is what would be the point of not doing it? Yes I would be avoiding the overload, but I can get overloads anyway from things I can’t get out of such as going to get my hair cut, or seeing family. I feel like if I were to give up the things that I enjoy, and that make good memories just to avoid overload I would regret it later in life. Yes it’s hard, and yes it’s not nice knowing that I won’t be able to blog about an event the day after I go to it, or have a nice relaxing day off after a day of hard work, but perhaps a better way to deal with this, than just stopping the things I enjoy, is to look at how I react to my overload.

Whenever I get an overload, and become frozen I always feel I should be doing something. “I cant just do nothing” I say. But as my Mum always says “Why not?” The idea of spending more time in bed on a day when I am overloaded never made sense to me. I get up at the same time, and sit around waiting for something to happen. But perhaps the key to all this could be something as small as training myself to do nothing; I don’t have to pick a film to watch, or a book to read if I can get myself in to a mindset where doing nothing is OK. In fact it’s needed.

I want to be a writer, and along with that a public speaker, and perhaps also a journalist and documentary film maker, and without trying to sound cocky I know I have what it takes to be all of these things. But I also know there will be a price to pay. I have to get used to the idea of paying that price, and try and work out how to lessen its impact rather than giving up on the idea of doing what I love. But on days when my overload is at its worst, thinking that way is hard to do. And I should also point out that I have cancelled a lot of stuff over the years due to overload, and I am sure I will cancel a lot more, but over all, and in answer to my own question, overload is bad, but yes it is a price worth paying for doing the things I enjoy – for me at least.

Let me know what you think in the comments, as how ever much I try, I can only really speak for myself.

You can find my book here  : http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum.html/ 

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Making my first phone call.

A few days ago I made a phone call. I put in the number, waited for someone to pick up, told them who I was and what I wanted, answered their questions, was passed on to someone else,waited on hold, sorted the issue out, said goodbye and hung up the phone. I know what some of you will be thinking “So what? That’s a phone call. People make them all the time. I don’t see the big deal!”. But because of the nature of this blog I know there are some of you who will be thinking something more along the lines of “Oh God that sounds awful! I hate doing that/the idea of doing that!” Due to my autism I am firmly in the second camp, and that’s why I wanted to blog about making a phone call, because – as I only realised after it was all over with – it’s the first phone call of that kind I have ever made.

I have called my family on a couple of occasions, although I don’t even like doing that, or talking to someone on the phone when they call me. It’s hard for me to put my finger on quite why I find talking on the phone so hard (even harder than talking to someone face-to-face I mean) Perhaps it’s because it is so hard to tell when I should be talking as I have no visual clues; I can’t see who I am talking to – it’s just a voice with no face attached to it. Also, when you phone a call centre the background is often noisy, and while some people might not even notice this, if you’re autistic it’s hard to filter out that background noise. And there is the issue of anticipation; if you know you have to make a phone call the anxiety and nervousness can build all day. But you have to put an end to that; you have to be the one to pick up the phone and make the call. But you also have the power to put it off which means that you can fall in to a cycle of putting it off as it’s so stressful which means you wait longer, which means you grow more stressed. The stress and anxiety of knowing you have to make a phone call can be huge. Your chest can go tight and you can start to turn over and over in your head what you might say, and what the person on the other end of the line will say back to you. And sometimes this will help to calm you, but other times it will just get you more and more worked up to the point of panic. To then have to pick up the phone, make the call, and deal with whatever it is you are calling about can be a massive task.

What seems so small, and day-to-day to some people can be a skill that it takes a life time to master (or get to grips with but not quite master in most cases) for autistic people. I am twenty two now, and as I say I have only just got to the point of making a phone call for myself. However, just because I made one phone call does not mean that I would be able to make another, or even that I would feel confident enough to call the same people back about the same issue if it were to happen again. But even if I am able to call them again, and call other people up and talk to them, that would not mean there would be no impact. My Mum (who is also autistic) has been making phone calls all her life, and can talk on the phone for three or four hours when sorting out a computer related issue, still gets all the same worry and stress that I do from the idea of using the phone. She is able to do it yes, but it still leaves her feeling worn-out, and takes a toll on her.

So I am aware that there might never be a time when I am able to use the phone with ease and free from stress, I might always get a tight chest and a sense of panic at the idea of having to ring someone up and talk to them, and even as an old man I might still do all I can to avoid talking on the phone. But now that I have made a phone call from beginning to end I do feel a certain sense of accomplishment. I know that for most people this is no big thing, but up until a few days ago it was something I had never been able to do. And I am glad that to a degree I feel I have at least somewhat got the hang of a skill that has eluded me for years. As I say, I might not be able to use that skill again next week or in the foreseeable future, but the fact that I have been able to use it even once is good in itself.

You can find my book here  : http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum.html/ 

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

How Dyslexia impacts on my writing and my confidence.

Most of what I write on this blog tends to be about autism, but I wanted to take the time to talk a bit about my dyslexia, and how it impacts on my work. I have written about having dyslexia in the past, but to tell the truth it’s not something I think about all that often. I get so caught up with my autism, and how that impacts on my day to day life that I tend to forget that I am dyslexic and dyspraxic too. However, at times I cannot help but think about it. When I work I am keenly aware of my dyslexia, and how much it slows me down and frustrates me.

My work is my writing; I write blogs, and articles about autism and disability in general, and, as yet unpublished, short stories and novels. I have co-written and published two autism books as well as writing my own autism-related book, and had that published last year. Like everyone who writes I go through times in my life where it is hard to write, and where I don’t get much work done at all. But most days I write something, and that has been the case for over ten years now, and yet I can’t spell or hand-write. If I were to be tested I don’t know what level my spelling would be at, but I know it would be poor. There are very few words I can actually spell right first time, and when it comes to spelling out loud that number goes down even more. When I type most of the words I get right I do so without thinking; my fingers just hit the keys. If I had to tell you out loud how to spell half the words I do manage to get right, I would not have a clue.

It will be hard for a reader to fully understand quite how bad my spelling is; by the time you read this blog it will have been spell-checked and edited by my Mum, so most if not all of the spelling or grammar mistakes will be gone. I could publish a blog without any spell-check or editing for you to get a full idea of what I mean, but I don’t think you would be able to read it. A lot of the time the inbuilt spell-checker does not even know what I am trying to type. It changes the word to what it thinks it is meant to be; sometimes to a word that is so close to being right that I don’t even notice it`s wrong until someone points it out – other times to seemingly random words. When this happens I have to resort to googling a word (as Google seems to have more luck working out what I am trying to say) and pasting it in to whatever it is I am writing.

My spelling has always been poor, and I am sure anyone who is dyslexic knows that feeling of frustration when you try over and over again to spell a word without getting any closer. But there is an added level of frustration when it impacts on what I do for fun, and my work. I write at a much slower pace than I would if I did not have to worry about my spelling, but its more than that – it’s the lack of confidence in my own work. A lot of the time I do not even feel like I can put a tweet out there without having someone else check it first to make sure I haven`t spelt everything wrong. I can’t ever see myself feeling confident enough to write a blog and publish it without having my Mum, or someone else check it over first. When writing is what you do it can be unbelievably frustrating to know that you are reliant on someone else to make even the most basic of your work understandable. I am a published author, and yet I do not even feel confident to send out a tweet on my own. As for making notes or hand-writing anything, there is next to no point in me even trying to do this anymore. I cannot even read my own handwriting! I have to type and I can type quite fast, so things now are a lot better than they were a few years ago, but there is still this underlying feeling of frustration at my poor spelling.

I don’t want this blog to be full of self-pity, but I felt that I needed to point out how much extra work myself, and fellow dyslexic writers have to put in to get our work ready to be read. There is a part of me which thinks that even with some of the difficulties that come with my autism, it’s my dyslexia that gets me down the most. That’s what makes it hard for me to do what I love, and that’s a huge part of what makes me so reliant on other people when it comes to my work. And even though I have gotten so used to it I might not think of it much, it’s the effects of my dyslexia that keep impacting on me day to day.

I don’t have any practical advice to leave you with in this blog as it was intended more as a way for me to vent some frustration, and explain how hard writing these blogs can be. But I might try and put together a list of tips and things that have helped me over the years, as well as things I might try in the future, and post that at some point.

You can find my new book: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34253.html

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

How Sensory Overload Impacts on Autistic People Part two – The Impact on my Body.

In my last blog I talked a bit about how doing events/talks, and going to do any kind of work can have a negative impact on my mind. I explained how the build-up of anxiety, added to the lack of time to rest after an event, can leave me unable to think clearly, and how it can take me weeks to even be able to pick what film to watch and to rest, let alone be able to work or go out again. But the impact of a stress and anxiety build-up and overload is not just mental, and there is also a physical side to it. I want to use this blog to speak about that, and explain what happens and how bad the physical effects of stress, and anxiety can be.

As I said in my last blog I did three events in November, all of which included talking to an audience, one-on-one chats, and busy rooms. There were build-ups of stress beforehand, and not much time to recover afterwards. But before I talk too much about these events and their impact I would like to go back, and talk about my book launch. On the night of the launch itself I was fine. I felt good and fully expected to feel fine the next day as well. And when I woke up I did feel fine, but as the day went on I started to feel worse and worse. By around eight at night my stomach felt as if it was being pulled and twisted from the inside. It felt as if it were piled with stones, and I could not even stay in one place for more than a few seconds before I needed to move to try and stop the pain building up too much. I knew full-well that I was going to be sick, and sure enough I was. In fact I was up till after three in the morning throwing up. The next day I was fine, I ate plenty and did not feel ill in the least. At the time I knew, or at least thought, that it must be some kind of physical release of all the stress that had built up before and during the event. As I said in my last blog I was not aware of feeling stressed before events, but I guess it must have been there inside – impacting on me whether I felt it or not.

I did not feel anything of the sort after the first event of last month, or the second, but the morning after the third event there it was again. That feeling of carrying around a pile of bricks in my gut. Pain and discomfort, but more than that. There was a sense of hopelessness. I knew then that the feeling was without any doubt due to the stress of the work I had been doing. It was a direct result of me going out and selling my books and doing talks. It’s hard to explain my feelings, perhaps pain most of all, to people in a way that they can understand, so you might think I am making a big deal out of a bit of stomach ache. But I have been sick and had a bad stomach plenty of times in the past, and I can tell you that this stress induced stomach pain was much, much worse than any I have ever had before.

There was a point, when I was bent over in pain the morning after the third event, where I began to wonder if I would be able to keep on doing that kind of work. Would I be able to commit to planning for an event knowing how I would be left feeling the day after? And more than that, was it worth it? I was in a huge amount of pain and I felt miserable. I should point out that despite what you might think I don’t often complain of pain. For me to react to pain at all it has to get to a point that most others would find hard to cope with. More than once in my life I have gone to see a doctor with an infection in my foot, or ear after weeks of saying only that “It’s a bit sore” to be told that it’s one of the worst they have seen, and they are shocked that I could even stand the pain of putting my shoe on, and walking in to the building. The point being that when pain is bad enough to make me feel miserable you know it must be bad.   So I have to admit I spent that morning feeling sorry for myself. But as time passed the pain began to grow less and less. By that afternoon I was able to relax and watch a film.

I realised after this that I would have to plan events better, and try to do something to stop the onset of pain like this again. I am sure that it is due to a build-up of stress. The stress builds up before the events without me feeling it, and once they are over and done with I feel the full force of the stress in a physical as well as mental form.

I know now that I need to make plans before events to try and stop this from happening, but I don’t know what will work, and the only way to find out will be to test things out. And that means that I might have to try a few things that do not work, and find myself in pain once again.

Because pain, or at least physical discomfort, is nothing new to me – I would say I feel uncomfortable much more often than I feel comfortable, at least when I am outside anyway – If I know I am going out, even if it’s to do something I enjoy, I will have pain in my gut, feel hot and sweaty, and have a tight chest sometimes for hours. And it’s not something that I ever get used to. When I used to go to Judo I would feel like that for an hour or so before going out, then after a few months of going, when most people would be getting used to it, I would start feeling that way in the afternoons, then in the mornings, and in the end I felt that way from the morning of the day before I was due to go out! In my head I wanted to go, I knew I would enjoy it, and as soon as I got there and got going I did enjoy it. But still I could spend up to twenty four hours in physical discomfort just because I was due to go out.  And for this reason I no longer go to judo.

So I don’t know what will work to rid myself of the pain and discomfort that stress, anxiety and sensory overload, can cause, but I want to do all I can to deal with this issue so that I can get out there and do my talks, and sell my book without feeling again like it might not be worth it.

Do any of you suffer from the physical symptoms of stress and anxiety?  Or the physical or emotional impact of sensory overload? If so do you have any tips or hints as to how to deal with them?

You can find my new book: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

 

Autism, theft and anxiety …

On Saturday I received a bank statement, and a letter from my bank telling me that their fraud department needed to get in touch with me. They wanted to check if some recent transactions had actually been carried out by me. After looking at my bank statement it became clear that the last five transactions on it were not actually mine. And in fact I had no idea where the money – which amounted to over one thousand pounds – had gone.

Crimes like this are fairly common place, and I wouldn’t normally feel the need to write a blog about something like this, but what did make me want to blog about my experience on Saturday was the fact that the actual crime itself, and any stress or anxiety caused by that, completely paled in to insignificance compared to the stress and anxiety of having to interact with people to get things sorted out. My first thought on seeing that the money was missing was not actually one of concern for what had been taken, it was a feeling of concern and frustration because I knew that even if this were resolved quickly it would still completely ruin my usual Saturday routine. This did turn out to be the case. Me and my Mum decided that the best thing to do was to walk to our local bank and raise the issue with somebody face-to-face so we got ready, and prepared to go out. My anxiety levels rose higher and higher as were getting ready, and walking to the bank. In the back of my head there was a mild anxiety about what would happen to my money, but as I say I assume such crimes happen all the time, and I was pretty confident that I would end up getting the money returned to me. There was still some mild anxiety around this as I wasn’t certain at that point. But that had nothing to do with the rising anxiety and stress. This came solely from the fact that I had no clue what I would need to do, or who I would need to interact with when I reached the bank. Would they be male or female? Young or old? Would we talk in an office? Would they ask me questions I didn’t know the answer to and put me on the spot? I had no clue. I knew that I had no choice but to go to the bank, and in a way I think that helped. There is always an option of course, but I wasn’t going to sit at home and simply let more money be withdrawn from my account. In terms of interaction within the bank it was fairly easy – my Mum did most of the talking – the only challenge being that we had to talk at the counter, and I was keenly aware of people standing behind us. We were advised on what to do and told to return home and call the fraud department immediately. There was an option to use a phone within the bank to do so, but we decided against this. Again it was public, but also I felt it would be impossible to concentrate in a busy environment such as that.

Far from being over, my anxiety levels began to rise even higher as we walked home. I should explain; I don’t speak on the phone, even with family or people I know well. And whenever there is any official business to sort out that can only be dealt with via a phone conversation I give permission for my Mum to speak on my behalf. But as I walked back from the bank I had no clue whether they would need to speak to me, perhaps simply to gain my permission to speak to my Mum, or even if they would insist on talking to me for the entire conversation. It wasn’t just the fact that I might have to speak on the phone, it was the fact that I didn’t know. I didn’t know who I would be speaking to, or what they would be asking me. In the end I did have to speak on the phone, only to answer a few basic questions and give my consent for them to speak to my Mum. This in itself was not an easy experience, but I will go in to more detail in another blog. After that phone conversation everything was resolved. They dealt with it quickly and efficiently and as I say I assume it is something they deal with every day. But the impact of the change of routine, stress and anxiety created on that day are still affecting me even now. I can’t say that it has nothing to do with the money being stolen – that would be silly – but in all honesty I think that is ten percent of the cause. The other ninety percent is to do with uncertainty, social interaction and change of routine.

This is one thing I have always found difficult about my autism; even if I myself react calmly to a situation, and I don’t feel particularly disturbed or distressed by it, there will always be something that comes along with that situation which brings anxiety and stress. I think a lot of people would find it hard to understand how little the theft of the money actually affected me. I assumed even when I saw it was gone that I would get it back, which I have. If you had seen me on Saturday you would have seen somebody who was clearly highly anxious, and no doubt you would have assumed it was due to the theft. But as I say, you would have been wrong.

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

And here`s the link to our new E Book Autism & Animals – the benefits of animals for autistic people https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01GO1N1X6

Autism, Overload and Bad Advice.

It is very common for people with autism to become overloaded, whether this is a sensory overload, an emotional overload, or a mixture of the two. Depending on what a person is doing in their life this may happen to them every few months, or every day.  Once someone has become overloaded it can become impossible for them to do even the most basic of tasks.

An overload will bring on both physical and mental fatigue.  This means that however much the person might want to be getting up and getting on with things, they lack the energy, or the capability to perform tasks that normally they might not even think twice about. There is one piece of advice that many people who are experiencing an overload are given by well-meaning people who genuinely believe that this advice will help – and that advice is to do more; to get out more, or to start new activities.  So what is the problem with this you might ask?  Stimulating the brain can often be helpful in replenishing peoples` energy supplies, but the problem is this; if you don`t even have the energy to do the things you want to do, then how are you meant to find the energy to do things that would be hard for you anyway, such as leaving the house to go outside.  Or doing some kind of new social activity.  The answer is that you probably won’t be able to find that energy because it quite simply isn’t there.  I completely understand that for non-autistic people a low mood can be cured by getting out and about, or trying something different.  But an autistic overload is not the same thing as a low mood.  It is like being in a video game and having a low energy bar.  If you go on to try to complete some task with almost no energy you are going to fail.  What you need to do is have a more tactical approach; plan a way of getting your energy up. Take the time to reset and relax and give your mind a break.  Cut out unnecessary sensory input, and build up to being able to do the things you would normally do.  Then if you are able to do those things you might think about expanding, and trying to get out more and do more.  But if you don`t have the energy to do more than go from one room of your house to the other all day, and even the idea of going upstairs and shaving or showering is something you have to build up to over hours or even days, then going out and doing something that even when you weren’t overloaded would be incredibly difficult, is not really a sensible way to make the situation any better.

I do enjoy going out and doing things, getting out of the house and having new experiences. But doing so always leaves me feeling overwhelmed and overloaded.  So I have to be in a good frame of mind and a good place to actually be able to attempt those things in the first place.  There is a saying that I have never really understood, and that is to fight fire with fire.  I am sure I don`t need to explain to anybody reading this how stupid that phrase is.  If you throw fire on a fire you end up with a bigger fire.  If you throw water on it you put the fire out (depending on the type of fire).  It might take a while, and it might be a hard task, but you get a result.  If you are overloaded do things that you know will calm you down and relax you.  It might be that going out to some places, perhaps to walk in the park or to the cinema at a quiet time of day does relax you.  In which case go for it and do whatever works for you.  My point is, don’t be surprised if most neuro-typical peoples` response to you feeling overloaded is that you need to get out of the house more, or you need to be doing more things.   It is not that the people who suggest this are stupid; this probably works for them, or their non-autistic friends because they don`t experience overloads in the same way that you or I might.  Sometimes an overload can appear to be the same as a low mood, or a lack of motivation.   But it is not that.  When I am overloaded I don’t need a motivational speech, or a meme telling me I can do anything I set my mind to.  I need to give my brain a break.  It is important to listen to the advice of those around you when you are in a difficult position, and to consider it.  But just remember, you don’t actually have to take it. You need to listen to what your body and mind are telling you, and do whatever you feel is best to make yourself feel better.

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

 

Anxiety & Stress, and the physical impact they can have.

We all know by now that autism and anxiety come hand-in-hand.  Anxiety can be provoked by even the smallest of things because to autistic people these things are not small.  It might be knowing that you have to go out, or worrying because your routine has been changing. But what kind of impact can this high level of anxiety, day to day, have on your physical health?  Well I can’t talk for everyone, but I can tell you the impact it has had on me over the last few years. First off I need to point out that with starting university, and some serious family issues my stress levels have been higher in the last two years than they ever have been before.

Normal physical reactions: What do I mean by normal? Well it`s common to feel some level of physical reaction when you have anxiety.  For example if I know I have to go out at eight at night then from around five I will start feeling cold inside, have pains in my guts and maybe even get a headache. I am more than used to this by now as I have had it all my life. When I used to have to go to school (I was home educated after age seven) I would feel sick all night and all morning before I got there.

That might be the case for everyone autistic or not, but being autistic I feel anxiety more than most. In fact anxiety affects me daily, as it does a lot of autistic people. But what about at times of high stress and anxiety? How severely can anxiety impact on my physical health?

Loss of sight: A little over a year ago, as I was coming to the end of my first year at university, I woke up one morning and tried to walk to the bathroom. As I walked across the landing I could feel myself growing weaker to the point where, when I got in to the bathroom, I had to lean up on the wall to stop myself falling to the floor. As this was happing my vision was also fading to be replaced by blackness. For a good few minutes I could only lean there dripping in sweat and unsure if I was throwing up or not due to the fact that I could not see a thing. This lasted for approximately five minutes, and once it had passed I of course went to A&E. and the doctors there said it was caused through stress and anxiety. Now I did end up getting very ill with an infection around the same time. But the view of most of the people I talked to was that this would not have brought on the loss of sight, but high stress might have. Having talked to someone who used to lose their sight quite a bit due to stress as a teenager I do think that stress/anxiety had a large role to play.

Chest pain: A few days ago, and around a year after the loss of sight, I woke up and got out of bed again only this time instead of my eyes it was my chest that was the issue. I had sharp pains around where my heart is, and when I sat up on the side of my bed they only got worse. I dressed, but when I bent down to tie my shoes I found I could not due to the pain that it caused me. This lasted for a while, and then only returned twice that day, with one-off sharp pains. All in all I had pains like that for four straight days. So how do I know it had anything to do with anxiety and stress? Well I did go to the Dr and was told it might be stress, or something to do with my muscles. But I think it was stress. I have had pains like that before you see, but only once or twice. The first time I got one I was in the middle of a meltdown, shouting and highly stressed. I had two sharp pains in my chest. Over the past week or so there have been a lot of meltdowns, and a lot of stress. I don’t see it as any coincidence that the pain came back worse than ever during those four days when I was extremely anxious and stressed.

When you live with high levels of anxiety and stress almost every day of your life you are bound to be impacted by it in some physical way. The human body can’t take that level of worry without reacting somehow, even just as a warning to you that you need to change something. After the pain in my chest I decided to take a short break, and then come back with a new plan, and routine to try and make my days less stressful.

Have any of you had your anxiety/stress impact on your physical health?  If so what have you done, if anything, minimise the chances of it happening again.

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762