Tag Archives: work

Autism and issues with my routine ….

Last week I wrote a blog about my new routine and how it has been helping me get more done, and feel better about myself, and while that’s true it would be misleading to leave it at that, and not talk a bit about some of the things that can, and have gone wrong with it. These are things that have gone wrong this time, but could also go wrong with any routine; so they are not issues with the routine itself, instead they are things that happen that impact on if, and how I can stick to my routine.

Sometimes it`s hard to establish a routine: What I mean by this is that for me if you do something a few days a week it`s not really a weekly routine. So when I plan out what I will be doing on each day of the week (planning to do the same thing each day) and then have to say “ Well not on Wednesday because I have to go out, and not on Friday because I have to go out then too.” It feels like I am not taking the time to get myself set in a new routine. Of course life throws up things you need to do, and I would not be able to stick to the same plan every day of my life, but if I can`t even stick to it for the first week how am I meant to feel like it`s a daily routine? If I only do it a few days each week it`s hardly a routine. The best thing would have been to clear a week, and do my routine each day so that I was in the swing of it then start to change it as, and when it was needed to fit in the other things life throws up. This way I would have been set in my routine, and more able to get back to it if it had to be changed one day.

Missing one part of it can mess up the whole day: If I say I am going to be up at six, work out and start my work by eight, and in fact I do not get up till seven then that can throw my whole day off. Why? You might be asking. I am at home all day after all, so what if I do the same things just an hour or two later than I was planning? And it`s a good point – that would be the smart thing to do. But sometimes it is not as easy as all that. Often I will try to get back on track after something has not gone to plan, and just find myself unable to do so. Try as I might the days where things go wrong early on hardly ever end up going well. If I am going to make a routine work I need to stick to it fully. Something as small as getting up a bit late can throw me off track for the whole day. Perhaps planning to get up as early as I do is the issue? I like to be up early and enjoy working in the mornings, but if I do have the whole day to work with perhaps I am less likely to fail to get up if I plan to get up a bit later? Or perhaps I just need to make sure I get to bed at a better time so I am less tired in the mornings? Either way that issue can be dealt with, but the point is that anything that goes wrong can mess up the whole routine for any given day.

Not having a plan B: Sometimes things will happen that you just can`t control, for example I get hay fever and sometimes it`s pretty bad. Some days it`s normal; just a blocked nose and a bit of sneezing – nothing too bad. Nothing I cant work through. But every now and then I wake up and it`s bad; I am sneezing every few seconds, my head hurts, and I am sweating and burning up. I feel dizzy, and at times like this there is just no point trying to work. It does not happen often, and only ever lasts a day at a time, but when it does it messes up my plans. I spoke about how I need to plan my rest time too in my last blog, or I end up doing nothing, and this ties-in with that. If I find myself waking up unable to do my routine I am often unsure of what to do. Do I try and do it? Do I admit that I can`t and do something else? What else is there to do? If I had a plan B, a back-up plan to be used on days when I can`t stick to my routine this would not be an issue. The plan could be something as simple as “Watch a few episodes of a certain TV show”. That might not sound like much, but when I am overloaded or feeling the impact of a sudden change of routine it`s very hard for me to find something to do. This is in part due to the fact that I don’t want to do anything, and just can`t get exited about doing things when I feel that way. Therefore, if I were to think about watching a T.V. show on the day I would not want to do it, but if it was pre-planned “If I am unable to do my routine I will watch this show” the chances of me forcing myself to do it (and enjoying it) are much higher. This cuts down on the risk of me just sitting around feeling overloaded after a change to my routine.

Having too much free time: Free time is good, and for me it is needed; I don’t like working to a routine where every minute of the day is planned beforehand (some people do, and it`s just a case of what works for you). But I found that I was working until 12 and then the next thing I had planned was to read at nine at night. This meant I had a lot of time to fill. It`s not to say I did not spend any of that time well: I got films watched, I read and I did work around the house, but I do think perhaps giving myself so much free time in the end was not helpful. I could have half that time, and still have a lot of time to relax and do whatever I want to do. Again how much time is planned, and how much is set in the routine will depend on the person, so to a point I am just trying things out to find out what works for me.

So overall I would say my new routine is a good one; it has helped me somewhat, and has definitely made me feel better on the days when it has worked, but it`s far from perfect yet. But that’s OK, as I said it`s about trying things out, seeing what works, what helps and what makes things worse, and coming up with a plan that helps me to get more done and feel better. That takes time and there might be a whole load more things to learn before we get there, but as long as we get there in the end that’s the main thing. And even in the mean-time having some kind of routine, some basic plan for at least parts of my day is helping me do more than I would if I had nothing at all. Things might not have worked out right away, but they hardly ever do and a good routine is something that’s worth taking the time to get right.

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Autism, and how routine is helping my low mood.

Lately I have been finding it hard to get things done. I have had low energy and a low mood, but it’s been hard to pinpoint just what the cause of this might be. I have tried my best to get on with things, but a lot of days I just end up falling asleep in the afternoon, and not even being able to decide which film to watch. Even the things I enjoy doing like watching films and reading have suffered. I was finding myself unsure of what to do most days, even though I had a lot of stuff I could do, or wanted to do I could not decide what I should be doing, and that made everything feel much more overwhelming than it really was. This meant that whole days were going by where I did almost nothing, and the things I needed/wanted to do just built up and up.

After talking to my Mum about this she offered to help me come up with a new routine to try and put some more structure in to my day. I did used to have a routine, but due to various family issues it has become disrupted.

We started the routine on Thursday night and I found it worked. On Thursday and Friday I was much more productive, and also found time to get the things I enjoy done. Knowing what I was doing, when, and for how long helped me. Having it written down and being able to tick off each thing as I did it was also a help as it allowed me to see what I had coming up next, and become used to the routine more quickly.

I am sure that I don’t need to go in to how important routine can be for autistic people as that has been talked about so much. As a child I worked on routines all the time. I can recall how hard it was when there was even a slight change to one. But I have to admit it did surprise me how much I still need a strict routine in my life.

Even as an adult if I don’t plan out what I am going to do I get nothing done. Let me give you an example that will show just how important a routine can be, and what a difference it can make.

On the first day of my new routine I was up at six, I did a work-out, showered, sat down and worked till lunch time. After lunch I watched a film, did some more work, and then spent the evening reading. It might not sound like a lot, but I had spent weeks worrying about how to fit all those things in to one day, but not actually doing any of them – that is despite the fact I am at home all day. But just knowing when I was going to do each thing and having it planned out for me meant I got it all done with ease. Not only did I get stuff done, but I ended the day feeling less tired and feeling better about myself.

Then let’s look at the weekend. The one fault with our new plan is that it does not cover the weekend. So I know what you might be thinking – why could you not just get up and do it anyway? Well I don’t know. But I found Saturday just drifting away. The truth is I am not even sure what I did – and I don’t mean that in a relaxed sense. I did not read, did not watch anything or do anything that I can think of. The day just seemed to pass, and then be over. Sunday was a bit better, but by that time it had become clear to both me and my Mum that just having the weekend as free time was not going to cut it. We needed to make at least a basic plan.

Because that’s the thing a lot of people don’t get about autism and planning; I don’t just need to plan when and how I work, I need to plan when and how I relax too. I can have all the free time in the world, but unless I have some structure and a plan nothing, or next to nothing, will get done. When I say I did nothing on Saturday I mean it; I did not have fun, or relax, I just drifted round unsure of what to do. The less structure there is the worse I feel, and the more worn-out I get. But just by putting a good routine in place and sticking to it all that can change. This morning I stuck to my weekly routine: I got up, worked out, went to the field with the dogs and wrote this blog by 09:17 in the morning.

The past few days have been a reminder to me how key routine is, and how despite not being a child any more having a good routine and structure to my day is just as important, and useful now as it ever was.

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Why research in to autism needs to be led by autistic people.

In my last blog I talked about an article put out in the Daily Mail linking autism to radicalisation. (  https://askpergers.wordpress.com/2017/06/29/are-autistic-people-at-a-greater-risk-of-being-radicalised-my-response/ )I explained why the ideas put forward in this article are wrong, and why I think the idea behind the article itself is dangerous. I am far from the only autistic person to take issue with the article; in fact I have yet to come across an autistic person who does think positively about it. One of the issues that came up the most when I was talking to other autistic people on twitter about this article, is the lack of autistic-led research around autism.

More often than not if someone is planning a research project around autism, wants to decide which projects will get the most funding, or wants to talk to the press about autism research, that person is not autistic. Often autistic people are not even consulted in these matters. If you look at the autism and radicalstion article the team behind that admitted on twitter that they had not worked with autistic people on the idea before they published it in the press. The article came out, and met with a strong reaction from the autistic community that you imagine would have been wholley predictable had the authors just talked to a few autistic people before-hand. In fact if they had spoken to autistic people they might have decided that the research they were planning to do would not be the most helpful – or at least focusing it on terrorism would not be. Perhaps it would have ended up being a wider piece of research looking at how autistic people can often fall victim to things like so called `mate crime` where they trust someone to the point of thinking they are still friends even after that person has hurt them, or tried to push them in to doing something they know to be wrong. This is something that can impact on a growing number of autistic people, and knowing more about it, and working with the police to help them understand, might genuinely help some autistic people. But as it was we got a poorly researched article that did little more than drum up fear around an issue autistic people had not even asked anyone to look in to. I am not trying to say that non-autistic people can`t do good work around autism – they can. But if you really want to know what you`re talking about, and be taken seriously then at some point you have to talk to the real experts – autistic people.

I am not alone in thinking that if professionals and researchers would take more time to listen to what autistic people are saying, and work with us instead of trying to do what they think is best, it would be better for all involved. We see a lot of studies coming out saying things like “Making eye contact can be painful for autistic people”, to which most autistic people reply “Well yes. We have been saying this for years.”

There is a sense that autistic people can say something for years, and it not be taken seriously until a non-autistic professional says it too. As if we can’t really be trusted to know or understand how our own minds work. And at the same time if a piece of research comes out that we don’t agree with we are meant to just take it at face-value, and accept things about ourselves that we know not to be true. While research by non-autsitic people does play a part in helping us all to understand autism – and I would not want to downplay that, or make it sound as if only autistic people should be working on understanding more about autism – I do think autistic people are well within our rights to reject some findings, or directions of research. We can look back to papers published by highly respected researchers in the 1940s and 1950s that blamed `cold and unfeeling Mothers` for causing their children’s autism, and see that at times it would be silly to accept something just because it’s written in a book by a so-called `expert.`

When things like this happen it often takes professionals years to admit they got it wrong, and all this does is deepen the divide between autistic people and the non-autistic professionals, leading to a situation where time and money is being directed at arguing a case that autistic people already know is silly, just to avoid having to back down. For a more recent example of this look at how the professional world has reacted to the idea of females being autistic. For years they said females could not be, but now – even after countless women and girls have been diagnosed – some (not all) professionals are still clinging to the idea that these females must somehow be super-manly on the inside, or else how could they be autistic? Instead of just admitting they got it wrong, and trying to look at why that might be, they still cling to the idea that autism is a male thing, even when the autistic person is female. Understandably this approach does not earn those professionals a lot of respect in the autistic community

Autism is a way of thinking, a way of feeling and a way of seeing the world, and the truth is autistic people are the real experts. I am not trying to say that non-autistic people don’t have a part to play in understanding autism, and thinking of ways to help autistic people with some of the things that we do find more challenging, but I am saying this needs to be done hand-in-hand with autistic people.

Perhaps if all research around autism were to be led by autistic people – or at least take the time to talk to us and find out what we want, and how we feel about things – there would be less conflict between the autism community and professionals. And autistic people might start to feel that our voices are being listened to. Much more could be achieved if autistic people and professionals were able to work with each other instead of clashing. But for that to happen autistic people need to be given a greater role in leading research, and studies around autism.

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

AUTISM: when you plan for a change that doesn`t happen …

It’s a well known fact that change is hard for people with autism. If we are going to cope well with it we need to spend time planning for it and be ready well in advance. But what if the time comes and in fact things do not change as we thought they would? Is that a good thing, and can we just get on with our old routine as if nothing has happened? I cant speak for everyone, but for me the answer to this is No. If I have spent days or weeks planning for a change, and going over it again and again in my head, and then the moment comes and I am told it is not happening that will throw me even more than the original change would have done. I can give you a recent example of this, and attempt at least to explain why it impacts on me in the way that it does.

Last month my Mum was due to go in to hospital for surgery. She would have been in for a few days but then after she came out she would have needed looking after for quite sometime. Things would have been very different; I would have been doing a lot of the jobs, we would not have been getting as much writing and ASK-PERGERS?social media done, and my Dad would have been coming around more. While none of this is bad in itself it would have been different, and therefore I needed time to plan it and get used to the idea in my head. We talked it over a lot, planned what time I might get up, what time I might do the jobs around the house, how we might still get some writing and editing done, what I might make to eat, and just about everything else. We knew we had to plan otherwise we were leaving ourselves open to things going wrong. As far as we knew we had everything planned and set up to deal with the change that my Mum going in to hospital would bring – only she ended up not going in.

I should point out that we did know her operation might not go ahead, and in fact I was not at all shocked when I got the text from her a few hours after she had gone to the admissions unit telling me there were no beds, and she had to come home. It’s just one of those things that can happen, and has been happening more and more lately. But even though none of us were surprised at this change of plans it did put us in a strange place. We were all ready for things to change; for the normal routine to be put on hold for a while and a new routine to take its place, and now none of this was going to happen.

So what is meant to happen in this or similar situations? Are you just meant to wake up the next day and get on with your normal routine – that thing you have been telling yourself for weeks you wont be able to do. For me it does not work like that; it has been a month since my Mum was meant to go in to hospital, and I don’t think we have really got back to any kind of normal routine with work, the house, going out or anything since then. That’s not to say we have not done anything productive, but we have not done it in a routined way. We spent so long getting in to the mindset that our routine was going to change that we have been unable to change back, and get in to our old routine when there was no need for change.

I don’t know about anyone else with autism, but I can`t plan for two possible outcomes in a situation like this. I can plan for the change of routine, but that takes so much planning, and so much time to get used to I don’t have any space left to make a real plan for what will happen if that change does not take place. Just looking at this one situation, how can you make a proper plan for something that is so uncertain? It’s OK to know in the back of your mind the change might not take place, the operation might be cancelled, but what then? When will it be rearranged for? A week? Two weeks? A month? Will there be a set date for it? Or will it just be when ever they can fit it in? All these things would need a plan of their own, but we have no way of knowing which one we would be planning for until after the operation was cancelled. What about things that we decided not to do as Mum would be in hospital? Do we plan to do them now that she is not going to be in? Or would it be best to just leave them?

For me it’s too much to think about and too uncertain to plan for. I can plan for a change to my routine – even though that is hard enough – but I cant make any real plans for a change to the change. I just have to deal with that as and when it happens. But that is not easy to do; not knowing what is meant to be happening or when tends to lead to nothing or not much getting done, and the stress of this added to the stress of the change can lead to meltdowns. This has been the case over the last few weeks, and I am not to sure what we could have done to prevent it. As I say planning for something so uncertain is hard to do, and there is something of a feeling that with so much change back and forth meltdowns were bound to happen.

You can find my book here http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum.html/

If you need any help or advice abut Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

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And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Post Halloween – why November can be such a difficult month for autistic people.

There has been a blog on this site before which talked about how hard Halloween can be for autistic people, and gave some tips for how to cope with this.  But what I want to talk about today is the weeks following Halloween. It`s easy to think that because the event itself is over that’s the end of it, but the truth is that with autism overloads and meltdowns often don’t kick in until much later. It might be a week or two after Halloween that all the change and sensory input finally catches up to someone. By this time the people around them, and perhaps the autistic person themselves, is no longer thinking about Halloween, and does not make the connection. But it is worth keeping in mind that any overload or meltdowns can be due to the impact of something that happened weeks before.

It’s not so easy for someone with autism to just change their routine overnight, and that’s what Halloween requires a lot of the time. Everything changes for a few days as you eat different food, and people’s houses take on a different look (if they decorate them). And along with this there is all the sensory input from children knocking at the door or running around outside doing trick or treat. You can’t just wake up the next day and be over that.

It might be that you take a few days to ease back in to the normal routine of things.  But this is where it becomes a bit tricky because things don’t quite go back to normal at all. November is a strange month anyway; there is Halloween leading in to it then Bonfire Night, and after that people start the count-down to Christmas. Fireworks go off all the time, and there are a lot more people out and about on the streets. It’s a month where you are meant to just get on with your normal life, and yet the world around you is changed. Everyone starts to talk about Christmas, and it feels as if things are changing all the time. Or at least everyone is getting ready for them to change. As I say fireworks start going off sometime in October, and don’t stop until January. It might be that some people with autism enjoy fireworks, and like going out to see them, but for a lot of autistic people having them going off most nights, and even in the daytime is too much. It`s added sensory input that comes at random times, and can be extremely stressful for autistic people.

It is important to remember that while November is meant to be a normal month, it is far from it. Part of it is spent getting over the impact of Halloween, and all the change/sensory overload that can come with this, and part of it is spent anticipating the change, and stress that can come with Christmas. Even if you do work around these two things it might be worth taking the time to talk about the month of November itself with your autistic loved one, or give it some thought if you are autistic yourself. How do you get around the fact that it is basically a month spent dealing with the events of the month before, and the anticipation of events to come in the month after?

Writing about this and planning might be the key; write down what will be different about November, for example fireworks, and Christmas decorations in shops. Write about what the positives of this change might be, and also the negatives. And try to see the last three months of the year as one big time of change, and sensory stimuli. Don’t look at it as one big time of change, then a break, and then a second change.

Even if you just take one part of November – the fireworks – and think about the impact they can have on autistic people, you can see why it can be such a hard time of year.  Loud noises can be enough to send some autistic people in to melt down, and even if this is not the case the build-up of noise/lights plus the unpredictable nature of them can take its toll. It might be worth investing in some head phones either to play music, or just to block out sound. You might not want to, or be able to keep these on all the time, but if you know fireworks get worse after it goes dark then you could have them to put on at this time.

November is a hard month. Perhaps harder than October or December due to the fact that everyone around you wants you to get on with it as if it were just a normal month. But keep doing whatever works for you on Halloween, or start doing whatever helps you get through Christmas early on. Talking, writing things down, planning, talking about what change will happen, and what it means as well as just being aware that things might be hard can all help. I know myself that even though the last three months of the year can be a lot of fun, they can also be a lot of hard work. Of course everything changes again in January but that is a blog for another time!

You can find my new book here: http://www.jkp.com/uk/communicating-better-with-people-on-the-autism-spectrum-34251.html

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Employable me

(Note: I have yet to watch this weeks episode)

For the last two weeks I have been watching Employable Me – me and seemingly everyone I follow on Twitter.  I just wanted to write a quick blog to discuss some of my thoughts on the show. When I first sat down to watch it I have to admit it was with a certain amount of trepidation. Whenever I watch anything that deals with autism I always have that mix of feelings; hoping it’s going to be good, but ready to cringe if it’s not.  But I am happy to say that so far Employable Me has not made me cringe at all.

We already know as autistic people, or as the families of autistic people, just how hard it can be for someone with autism to find work. Not everyone of course, and some people have no issue getting a job.  But for most autistic people it is hard.   A lot of that hardship comes not from their autism, but from the attitudes of employers.  It’s good to see that the show deals with this.  The main point for me, and one the show seems very keen to make, is that autism will not stop you working, but pre-conceived ideas about autistic people might.  Now that being said, I know for some people their autism might stop them from being able to work, but what I mean is that not everyone who is autistic will be unable to do so.

People by and large, whether they are autistic or not, want to work. They want to feel as if they can take care of themselves, and their families, and that they do not have to rely on the state to take care of them – that they are not at the mercy of changes to benefits. Getting a job can have all kinds of advantages for anyone, but for autistic people it can also provide routine, and a sense of independence. Not only that, but it’s clear to anyone who knows anything about autism that at times it can benefit an employer to have autistic people working for them. I have written a lot in the past about the positive traits that can come with autism. Such as an eye for detail, dedication and creative thinking.  And it’s good to see that the show highlights these instead of just trying to make us feel sorry for autistic people.

Overall I am enjoying the show, and I can see why it is going down so well among autistic people. It highlights a very real and important issue that a lot of autistic people face.  An issue that lots of autistic people have been trying to draw attention to for years now.  Putting it out there in the public eye must be a good thing. Another thing that I enjoy about the show is that is manages to portray how funny things can be without feeling like it is making fun of autistic people.  It is funny in parts because that’s just how life is. But despite that is does not feel as if it is set up to make light of people, and their autism. I plan to keep watching it, and see how it goes on.  Hopefully it will continue to be good.  Let me know what you think of Employable Me down below.  Do you enjoy the show?  Tell me what you like or dislike about it.

If you need any more help or advice about Asperger`s/Autism or simply want to talk about it check out our free help and advice service ASK-PERGERS?

Twitter https://twitter.com/ASKPERGERS

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ASKPERGERS?ref=hl

And have a look at our books (at the time published under pseudonyms, but we did write them trust us on that!)  http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/author/1762

Work vs Rest.

One of the things that is talked about a lot when it comes to dealing with stress, and overloads in autistic people is rest days; basically just taking a day to relax, and not having to worry about doing anything.  It might be a set day each week, or it might just be decided depending on how the individual feels day to day.  I myself talk about them, and advise autistic people to take them, and not to feel guilty for not doing much on those days.  But as much as I talk about them, and know them to be a good thing I still find it hard to take my own advice, and let myself have days off.  I find that I have a lot to fit in; I write both books and articles, I edit my work, I like to read, work out, and watch films most days. There are also the things I might not want to do that need to be fitted in: jobs around the house, or going out somewhere. Well if I take a whole day off doing things like that, or even if I just relax and only do a small amount I start to feel guilty, as if I should be doing something. I know in my own head that the quality of my work will be poor if I work on days when I feel overwhelmed, or even on the point of a shut down.  And yet I still find it hard to allow myself to have a day of resting.

I like to work and I like to end the day knowing I have done a lot of work.  But it is about time I started taking my own advice.  There is no point pushing yourself past the point where you work starts to slump.  Working hard is great if you also work well, but you can work as hard and as long as you like only for it to be pointless if you don’t work well.

I find that something as simple as having a rest day means that I am able to come back and do better work both in my job, and just around the house, and in life in general.

The issue is trying to stop feeling guilty, or lazy for saying you are having a day off.  In fact relaxing, and resting is a key part of working well.  Pushing yourself to your limits is fine, but its also OK to set up a good work and rest balance, and stick to this.  Different things work for different people, but my advice would be – if you feel you need rest days, then take them. Don’t worry about feeling lazy, just take the day off, and get back to things the next day.  It is a part of autism – at least for some people it is.  It might mean you clash with the way you like to do things, but finding a way of being at ease with the idea of resting is important if you wish to get the best from yourself work-wise.

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